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91
Discussions - Public / Re: DC area
« Last post by JoFrance on August 29, 2018, 03:30:16 pm »
My ladybugs definitely do not bite.  They're just cute.  I've never seen a black squirrel, but I've seen a beige one every now and then.  I think overall, the wildlife where I live has dwindled.  I live on the edge of a wildlife refuge and I see a shrinking of their environment.  I really don't know why, but we used to have lots of bumble bees and now we have a couple of them.
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Discussions - Public / Re: DC area
« Last post by The Gorn on August 29, 2018, 01:58:12 pm »
Ditto on the southern weather here, too.

Do your ladybugs bite? Around 2002, the indigenous ladybugs here in Ohio got completely squeezed out and replaced by these invasive !@&( Asian ladybugs which have a slight orange tint to the wings and which bite painfully and pinch when they land on you. The Asian bugs, of course, were imported into the US as a feature of trans national shipping. Thanks Wal-Mart and China!  >:(

It's weird how species get replaced so quickly. Riding my bike this summer I periodically came across several black or mostly black squirrels along the bike trail. The black squirrels I had seen before were only in Canada, Ottawa area years ago. I was told that the black squirrels are more aggressive and displace the grey native squirrels. I have no idea where they come from. 
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Discussions - Public / Re: DC area
« Last post by JoFrance on August 29, 2018, 01:48:00 pm »
I like Indian Summer.  It gives you one last taste of warm weather before the autumn temps take over.  Usually the lady bugs are all over the outside of my house trying to get in during that time.  Lots and lots of them.  They get in no matter what we do.  They find a little nook or cranny and hibernate all winter.  They're really unobtrusive and hide until Spring when they make their escape.  I don't mind them.  They're cute.  Stinkbugs are another thing.  I'm glad most of them got killed off last winter.

This weather feels like SC.  Its either in the 90's and humid or we get torrential rain.  The mosquitos are nasty this year.  I am so bit up I can't stand sitting outside.  They're hip to bug spray.  If I use it, they bite my face, head or the bottoms of my feet.  We have a lot of deer here and when I look at them outside trying to eat everything, their tails are swatting off the bugs constantly.

Weather-wise, this has been a tough year.
94
Discussions - Public / Re: Anyone Here Installed IP Cameras?
« Last post by ilconsiglliere on August 28, 2018, 09:03:22 am »
Basically, you have gravitated to a standards-compliant "open architecture" solution. I like this the best.

The cameras such as Ring, and also there is an entire crop of dedicated vendor specific security thingies like Ring, some with multiple purposes... all of em demand that you subscribe to the vendor's monitoring services, and they keep your videos on the cloud.

I just don't like devices that anchor you to a vendor forever for subscription payments for something that you don't use consistently. These devices generally don't even HAVE a "generic webcam" setting that lets you monitor the stream locally. You connect it to the vendor, period.

POE is the best approach for the reason you stated and that's why it exists. I don't think there is special POE cable - the standard CAT6 or CAT5 works fine.  In the event of a power failure you can have the switch or hub the cameras are plugged into on a battery backup, so all cameras continue to receive power. Without POE, every station needs its own backup.

I think you're on the right track. I wouldn't bother with Ring, Nest, etc. because of the vendor lock-in.

Exactly about the open standards. I didnt even realize till last week there was an open standard towards security. These Ring and Nest things are a total rip off IMO. There is lots and lots of problems with these Nest thermostats. Thanks but I will stick with digital Honeywell. No I cant control it remotely but I dont care.

I agree with your assessment about the subscription and proprietary stuff. I dont want anything that I have to pay a monthly recurring cost. I already pay to much every month that I have no choice starting with the stupid cell phone and cable.

I also dont want jack in the cloud. You can keep your cloud.

As for the proprietary stuff, we already endure way to much of this via Microsoft, Apple and the telcos. No thanks.

I am in the process of putting Cat6 through my entire house. So to put in a little more for cameras is not a big deal. I want it in all the bedrooms and any of the rooms where there is a TV. Here is the reality - wireless is pretty good but its still not a wire.

My brother thinks I am insane dragging Cat6 through the house. I found an easy way to get it to the attic - I have a stack that is in the wall that goes from the basement to the roof. The previous owners already had put tons of coax in there so I have ready made pulling lines. I am also putting new coax through the house with the ethernet.

I have done quite a bit of reading about the POE and I think its a brilliant idea. You just have to buy POE switches and they are dirt cheap - just uses standard ethernet cable. Nothing fancy.

https://community.fs.com/blog/how-to-choose-cables-for-power-over-ethernet.html

https://www.networkworld.com/article/2323509/data-center/power-over-ethernet--one-cable-fits-all.html

I have been reading about these IP cameras and they have obsoleted the traditional cameras which usually have coax and a power supply along with a NVR with the software in it. The beauty of this with Synology is the software is already there. QNAP which is another NAS fendor also has camera software in their NAS.
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Discussions - Public / Re: Anyone Here Installed IP Cameras?
« Last post by The Gorn on August 28, 2018, 07:25:54 am »
Oh, there is a third option for connectivity: cameras powered independently but using Wifi.

Ring and Nest and other big brands certainly do this as their default mode of operation.

So there's physical one connection per camera, except it's power, with all that entails. Power goes out? It would be reasonable to have some onboard battery backup. Otherwise that's one point of failure.
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Discussions - Public / Re: Anyone Here Installed IP Cameras?
« Last post by The Gorn on August 28, 2018, 07:22:30 am »
Basically, you have gravitated to a standards-compliant "open architecture" solution. I like this the best.

The cameras such as Ring, and also there is an entire crop of dedicated vendor specific security thingies like Ring, some with multiple purposes... all of em demand that you subscribe to the vendor's monitoring services, and they keep your videos on the cloud.

I just don't like devices that anchor you to a vendor forever for subscription payments for something that you don't use consistently. These devices generally don't even HAVE a "generic webcam" setting that lets you monitor the stream locally. You connect it to the vendor, period.

POE is the best approach for the reason you stated and that's why it exists. I don't think there is special POE cable - the standard CAT6 or CAT5 works fine.  In the event of a power failure you can have the switch or hub the cameras are plugged into on a battery backup, so all cameras continue to receive power. Without POE, every station needs its own backup.

I think you're on the right track. I wouldn't bother with Ring, Nest, etc. because of the vendor lock-in.
97
Discussions - Public / Anyone Here Installed IP Cameras?
« Last post by ilconsiglliere on August 28, 2018, 07:03:31 am »
I started looking at putting in some kind of home security because of issues where some of my family members live. I started looking at a doorbell cameras specifically one made by this company named Ring. After doing a lot of reading it appears to have issues. Doorbells are uncomplicated things involving a 12v power supply, the chime and the doorbell switch itself. Its basic - the switch is on/off. No electronics, no nonsense.

Anyway with this Ring thing you hook your existing wiring to the switch, put in this thing on your chime and its supposed to work.

https://www.amazon.com/Ring-Doorbell-existing-doorbell-required/dp/B01DM6BDA4

If you read the comments - lots of unhappy campers. Never mind all the glowing reviews, we all know how that goes. I like to read the negative reviews. It seems to me its overly complicated and a lot of $$.

So than I moved on to plain security systems. I looked at Nest, Arlo by Netgear and Circle by Logitech. All involving a lot of $$. All are either wired/wireless and some require batteries or a power supply. Lots of grief of it again.

So than I moved on to plain IP cameras with a NVR (Network video recorder - it replaces a DVR and is either a dedicated device or you use a NAS that has built in software).

I would prefer to use the NAS solution by Synology. I have a Synology NAS already and this thing is AWESOME. No fuss, no muss - no MS Windows. It runs their own version of Linux and its literally plug and play. Anyway Synology comes with something called Synology Surveilance Station. Its software to control IP cameras as part of the OS.

https://www.neowin.net/news/review-of-synologys-surveillance-station-a-free-ip-camera-tool-for-synology-nas-devices/

You just have to pick out IP cameras that are compatible and per Synology something like 5000 cameras are compatible with it.

The IP cameras themselves come in 2 flavors - network cable and power supply or POE (Power Over Ethernet). I am leaning toward the POE as I only have to run POE ethernet cable instead of ethernet and a power supply. I have run lots of wire myself in my house so it not a big deal to do it.

So I was wondering if anyone has done this?
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Discussions - Public / Re: DC area
« Last post by The Gorn on August 27, 2018, 08:43:32 pm »
I wonder where the term Indian summer came from.

Get woke. Wikipedia will set you free:

Quote
An Indian summer is a period of unseasonably warm, dry weather that sometimes occurs in spring and autumn in the Northern Hemisphere. Indian summers are common in North America and Asia. The US National Weather Service defines this as weather conditions that are sunny and clear with above normal temperatures, occurring May 1st to Mid-June and late-September to mid-November.[1] It is usually described as occurring after a killing frost
...
Although the exact origins of the term are uncertain,[4] it was perhaps so-called because it was first noted in regions inhabited by Native Americans ("Indians"), or because the Native Americans first described it to Europeans,[5] or it had been based on the warm and hazy conditions in autumn when Native Americans hunted.[4]

In literature and history, the term is sometimes used metaphorically. The title of Van Wyck Brooks' New England: Indian Summer (1940) suggests an era of inconsistency, infertility, and depleted capabilities, a period of seemingly robust strength that is only an imitation of an earlier season of actual strength.
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Discussions - Public / Re: DC area
« Last post by unix on August 27, 2018, 07:08:49 pm »
I wonder where the term Indian summer came from.
100
Discussions - Public / Re: DC area
« Last post by The Gorn on August 27, 2018, 04:23:30 pm »
Burnin up here in Ohio. 92 today. Summer's last hurrah, I hope.
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