Recent Posts

Pages: 1 ... 5 6 7 8 9 [10]
91
Discussions - Public / Re: Amusing or Outstanding Image Memes
« Last post by ilconsiglliere on June 02, 2018, 07:06:55 am »
92
Discussions - Public / Re: Amusing or Outstanding Image Memes
« Last post by ilconsiglliere on June 02, 2018, 07:05:40 am »
93
Discussions - Public / Re: Manhunt on Netflix
« Last post by I D Shukhov on June 02, 2018, 06:28:31 am »
Think I will.  Thanks.
94
Discussions - Public / Manhunt on Netflix
« Last post by unix on June 01, 2018, 04:25:59 pm »
It's the series about the Unabomb set in the mid 90's of course. (Note the correct spelling, later changed by Media to Unabomber)

But that's not what I am writing about. I am writing about the hazardous work conditions for the contractor, the linguistics guy who was analyzing the manifesto. Good God, it's just like IT.  I think the show nailed it to a "T".  They tell him he is a piece of sheet every other day and replaceable, and even after he cracks they case, they are skeptical.

The irony of it all he goes living in the woods after catching the Unabomb (minus the bombs)

Plus tons of linguistics, which I love.

Watch it!!!
95
Discussions - Public / Re: so how is the economy?
« Last post by unix on June 01, 2018, 04:23:13 pm »

I think the real situation is far worse than being admitted on the forums, or anywhere. Aside from a few hotspots like DC.
That's what the Federal Reserve and United Way reports referenced in the Post article say.  I've read about the large number of people who can't handle an unexpected $400 bill for a couple of years now.  It's hard to believe, but that's what the Fed is tracking:

Quote
One of the most widely watched statistics in the Fed's “Report on the Economic Well-being of U.S. Households” is how many adults say they could cover an unexpected $400 expense. When the survey was released for the first time in 2013, half of those surveyed said they didn't have enough savings to cover an emergency expense of a few hundred dollars.

Today that has fallen to 40 percent, a figure that is better but still troubling to many economists. It means nearly 48 million households aren't saving or are unable to save.

I.e. their cash flow is a net <= 0 and they have no way of borrowing money.


Yes and that is the proverbial canary in the coal mine?

96
Discussions - Public / Re: so how is the economy?
« Last post by JoFrance on June 01, 2018, 03:07:56 pm »
Pxsant, if the labor market tightens, companies will have to offer workers better salaries and benefits.  Curbs are being put on immigration and visa over stayers.  This is good news for IT workers, finally.

https://www.zdnet.com/article/trump-administration-issues-new-h1-b-visa-guidelines/

Also, companies benefited greatly from the lowering of the corporate tax rate making the US more competitive in the world market.  There was a great jobs report for the last month and there is more employment.  Maybe all of the jobs aren't fabulous, but they're better than we've seen for a long, long time - and they're full time.  In a couple of years, P. Trump's policies are going to pay off, IMO.

I'm seeing a lot of small business "help wanted" signs now.  A lot of people just do everyday jobs, like waitressing, retail, hospitality or more blue-collar occupations.  Its an upward trend for them.

The "lazy" millennial son of my neighbor finally found some kind of a job and moved out of the basement.  Before that he was a "personal trainer", part time.  He rode his father's motorcycle to and from his "sessions".  They couldn't wait for him to go.  He was close to 27.  I think a lot of young people don't understand you have to work your way up to the job you want, you don't just walk into it because you have a college degree. 
97
Discussions - Public / Re: so how is the economy?
« Last post by I D Shukhov on May 30, 2018, 06:11:24 pm »
You hear a lot about "lazy" millennials not going out and getting decent-paying jobs so they can support themselves.  Another possibility is that they can't because good jobs are in short supply. 

Although I suppose another explanation is that there was so much whining about working in a boss-worker environment by us baby boomers that they don't want any part of it.
98
Discussions - Public / Re: so how is the economy?
« Last post by pxsant on May 30, 2018, 04:15:58 pm »
It's going to take years to recover from the beating we took in 2008 and lack of good paying jobs since then.  Hopefully, that is coming back.  As the baby boomers retire, hopefully those jobs will go to American workers. We should keep the good paying jobs for Americans.

You are dreaming.   What good paying jobs are you talking about?    We are on a downhill slide regardless of what the stats say.   The unemployment raw numbers have dropped but what they don't tell you is the fact that the jobs out there are at a significantly lower wage than they were a few years ago.   Many people can't survive on what they make now.  And many people have simply dropped out of the workforce and are no longer counted in the unemployment numbers.

Also, American workers??  These large corporations don't give a rat's behind about American workers.   At the bank where I currently consult, I am one of the rare Americans there.   Most of the people are from India.

I am very close to hanging it up with corporate America.   I am simply fed up with the thieves that run these corporations.
99
Discussions - Public / Re: so how is the economy?
« Last post by JoFrance on May 30, 2018, 03:19:39 pm »
Its going to take years to recover from the beating we took in 2008 and lack of good paying jobs since then.  Hopefully, that is coming back.  As the baby boomers retire, hopefully those jobs will go to American workers. We should keep the good paying jobs for Americans.
100
Discussions - Public / Re: so how is the economy?
« Last post by I D Shukhov on May 29, 2018, 05:25:21 pm »

I think the real situation is far worse than being admitted on the forums, or anywhere. Aside from a few hotspots like DC.
That's what the Federal Reserve and United Way reports referenced in the Post article say.  I've read about the large number of people who can't handle an unexpected $400 bill for a couple of years now.  It's hard to believe, but that's what the Fed is tracking:

Quote
One of the most widely watched statistics in the Fed's “Report on the Economic Well-being of U.S. Households” is how many adults say they could cover an unexpected $400 expense. When the survey was released for the first time in 2013, half of those surveyed said they didn't have enough savings to cover an emergency expense of a few hundred dollars.

Today that has fallen to 40 percent, a figure that is better but still troubling to many economists. It means nearly 48 million households aren't saving or are unable to save.

I.e. their cash flow is a net <= 0 and they have no way of borrowing money.








Pages: 1 ... 5 6 7 8 9 [10]