Recent Posts

Pages: 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 [8] 9 10
71
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2018/05/25/the-alarming-statistics-that-show-the-u-s-economy-isnt-as-good-as-it-seems

According to two reports by the Federal Reserve and United Way:

* 40% of American adults don't have enough savings to cover a $400 emergency expense

* 43% of households can't afford the basics to live, meaning they aren't earning enough to cover the combined costs of housing, food, child care, health care, transportation and a cellphone

* 22% of adults aren't able to pay all of their bills every month.

Quote
We have a ‘Two Realities’ economy in America,” said William Rodgers, a professor at Rutgers University and chief economist at the Heldrich Center for Workforce Development. “One segment has truly recovered from the Great Recession and is at full employment. The other continues to experience stagnating wages, involuntary part-time employment, inflexible work schedules and weaker access to health care.

Quote
President Trump and many Republicans in Congress are focused on getting people back to work with the belief that once people have jobs they will be able to lift themselves out of poverty. But a growing body of research like the Fed and United Way studies and anecdotes from people working on the front lines at food banks and shelters indicates that a job is no longer enough.

Quote
Half of the people we serve are above the poverty level. They are working, but they are not making it,” said Catherine D'Amato, president of the Greater Boston Food Bank. “It’s a deep struggle for people to provide for themselves based on their wages.”

D'Amato has worked at food banks and pantries since 1979, but she says she's never seen it like it is today with so many people with jobs but still unable to survive. October and November were the highest food bank usage on record for her organization, a reminder that many are still not stable years after the Great Recession officially ended in 2009.
72
Discussions - Public / Re: so how is the economy?
« Last post by The Gorn on May 28, 2018, 06:54:48 pm »
Interesting.

The real estate market heating up does not make any sense - to me.

As Jo noted in her area, in my area (comparable in some ways to Central Jersey, a bit) a lot of factories relocate here and that drives jobs... a bit. But I honest don't see either jobs or wages driving wealth much in my area for the general public.

I have read that residential real estate appreciation is on a huge upward spike nationally.  My guess is that investors are simply deploying cash to investments other than the stock market or Bitcoin as a risk mitigation tactic.

IE - what does the money supply (M-numbers) indicate?
73
Discussions - Public / Re: so how is the economy?
« Last post by JoFrance on May 28, 2018, 02:34:22 pm »
The reason it makes sense is now there are new jobs brought to the area.  We lost thousands of jobs out where I live when Merck moved out.  Now, we have a new, big company taking over their facility.  I think its Unicom.  People will want to live near where they are working and maybe I can sell my house.  Its a great place for someone younger.  I can't deal with all the property anymore.
74
Discussions - Public / Re: so how is the economy?
« Last post by unix on May 28, 2018, 11:37:02 am »
Interesting.

The real estate market heating up does not make any sense - to me.
75
Discussions - Public / Re: so how is the economy?
« Last post by JoFrance on May 27, 2018, 03:24:35 pm »
The real estate market is starting to heat up where I live, but it isn't there yet.  We have a new big company that will be coming into the area soon and that will boost property values, I hope .
76
Discussions - Public / Re: so how is the economy?
« Last post by I D Shukhov on May 27, 2018, 03:15:25 am »
There is in a contradiction in higher real estate prices and the 'new low'.

Weird. Wouldn't you think that as we establish a 'new low', real estate would suffer as a result? Yet a new bubble is forming, or seems to be.

Housing in DC area is all over 400K for anything. The salaries are higher than in the fly-over wasteland but not so much higher to make it cheaper.
This will change at some point.  Remember how For Sale signs sprout up everywhere when the real estate market turns south? 
77
Discussions - Public / Re: so how is the economy?
« Last post by unix on May 26, 2018, 11:53:15 am »
There is in a contradiction in higher real estate prices and the 'new low'.

Weird. Wouldn't you think that as we establish a 'new low', real estate would suffer as a result? Yet a new bubble is forming, or seems to be.

Housing in DC area is all over 400K for anything. The salaries are higher than in the fly-over wasteland but not so much higher to make it cheaper.
78
Discussions - Public / Re: so how is the economy?
« Last post by The Gorn on May 26, 2018, 07:55:24 am »
My opinion is that we have a constantly-declining "new normal" with minor upticks. In other words, the centerline or baseline what is considered a good economy today is continually declining from what we expected in the past. The full employment economy of 2018 looks like a minor depression compared to the full employment economy of 1998.

All I know is what I see locally here in Ohio. A house that 10 years ago would have gone for 110 (maybe) closed on our street recently for 178K.  Nothing by DC standards but by flyover standards we have some strong real estate speculation going on here. I constantly get a post card from some slumlord company that wants to buy my house for a rental (most of my street is owner occupied by a wide margin so I am sure they would be eager to fuck up our neighborhood for a quick profit.)

And Ohio is meth junkie and poor education / low economic value central where nobody can make anything good or valuable.
79
Discussions - Public / so how is the economy?
« Last post by unix on May 26, 2018, 06:55:04 am »
I have my own opinion but wanted to hear other reports from the trenches.

I see a lot of sales, a lot of discounts on everything which suggests people aren't spending.

20% off on this, 25% off on that. On everything. Automotive, clothing, household and in private sales as well.



80
I think it's the same situation as with computers. See how many careers that field has opened?

For one I have severe doubts this shyt will become mainstream anytime soon. It will remain exotic and expensive stuff they show at shows, but how much will that cost when it goes into full production, if ever? 250 grand each?

It will be expensive to own, expensive to maintain. And only toys for billionaires essentially and not practical at all for anyone you know.

That is all assuming they solve the issue of power supply.  That thing has to run off a wire connected to it at all times or have a 5 minute runtime off its own internal Li-ion batteries.

Much cheaper to just hire someone.







Pages: 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 [8] 9 10