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What an interesting story.

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Most business owners would get a lot out of your article because its honest.  Sometimes you can't see whats wrong with your business and it takes an outside opinion to open your eyes.  I think people would consider you an advocate on the side of the small business person achieving success.
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Discussions - Public / Re: so how is the economy?
« Last post by unix on June 11, 2018, 03:50:52 pm »
He_is_right_you_know.jpg

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All Technology & Tech Help / Re: Udemy
« Last post by The Gorn on June 11, 2018, 06:36:50 am »
This bout of spending caused me to look in more detail at the stuff I already owned just laying there. I'm now going through one course I probably bought 2-3 years ago. (The basics of marketing to small business, which I've finally realized I know almost nothing about.)

These courses are pretty watchable through a Fire TV even though there is no dedicated app. I installed the Silk browser, logged into Udemy through it, and when I click to watch a video it fills the screen.
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All Technology & Tech Help / Re: Udemy
« Last post by pxsant on June 11, 2018, 03:06:52 am »
The next time you post a link to a sale on Udemy the first course I buy will be "doing your own 12-step program to recover from course buying addiction."

Tell me about it.  Over the years I have bought 99 courses and only done about 1/3 of them!
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ilconsigliere,your anecdote about being courted for a job by that three letter car company makes perfect sense in this way:

As an employee you're rewarded for being in the template of the values of the business and for being an enthusiast and a techie in the business's line of work.

As a startup business owner, this tendency shoots you directly in the foot. You need to drop the great skills at --- cars, racing, car mods --- and take care of all the other crap that a car related business requires. While still selling excellent products.

This blog post and the "E-Myth" are both about retaining that love of subject matter when you start your own business. You have to let it go a bit if you want that business.

If you do that as an employee, you're looked on as burning out or alienated.

I agree with what you are saying. Your goal is sales and $$.
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Point taken about the autism, ilconsigliere. :D But you know weaponized autism is a powerful force that serves your own fascist interests, too. :P

So I guess I communicated the core ideas well.

Guys, here's the deal with this article. I stated this and nobody really picked up on it.

This article is not intended specifically as helpful. It basically describes a problem that all small business owners must eventually deal with when they run a business that uses their own core talent.

This article is chicken soup for the overwhelmed small business owner.

I want visitors to get the idea that I'm on their side, I "get" how hard their chosen life is, and I'm here to help.

That alone, that in itself is my slimy agenda with this article. Not to clone "The E-Myth" ideas. I'm just using the E-Myth as a platform for this feelgood material.

I also wanted to agitate with envy and irritation by describing the dumb a$$-ho**s who earn so much more by being superficial sales types in the same lines of work.

And then reel the reader back in to reality by telling them how they can start to dig out.

I'm not writing this article for my freaking health or for writing brownie points. I want to "touch" my possible customers with the idea that I'm in their corner and I "get it."

I assume it does that, at least partially. What do you think?

I think if that was your intent it works.
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ilconsigliere,your anecdote about being courted for a job by that three letter car company makes perfect sense in this way:

As an employee you're rewarded for being in the template of the values of the business and for being an enthusiast and a techie in the business's line of work.

As a startup business owner, this tendency shoots you directly in the foot. You need to drop the great skills at --- cars, racing, car mods --- and take care of all the other crap that a car related business requires. While still selling excellent products.

This blog post and the "E-Myth" are both about retaining that love of subject matter when you start your own business. You have to let it go a bit if you want that business.

If you do that as an employee, you're looked on as burning out or alienated.
49
Point taken about the autism, ilconsigliere. :D But you know weaponized autism is a powerful force that serves your own fascist interests, too. :P

So I guess I communicated the core ideas well.

Guys, here's the deal with this article. I stated this and nobody really picked up on it.

This article is not intended specifically as helpful. It basically describes a problem that all small business owners must eventually deal with when they run a business that uses their own core talent.

This article is chicken soup for the overwhelmed small business owner.

I want visitors to get the idea that I'm on their side, I "get" how hard their chosen life is, and I'm here to help.

That alone, that in itself is my slimy agenda with this article. Not to clone "The E-Myth" ideas. I'm just using the E-Myth as a platform for this feelgood material.

I also wanted to agitate with envy and irritation by describing the dumb a$$-ho**s who earn so much more by being superficial sales types in the same lines of work.

And then reel the reader back in to reality by telling them how they can start to dig out.

I'm not writing this article for my freaking health or for writing brownie points. I want to "touch" my possible customers with the idea that I'm in their corner and I "get it."

I assume it does that, at least partially. What do you think?
50
Discussions - Public / Re: so how is the economy?
« Last post by The Gorn on June 10, 2018, 07:08:49 pm »
Of course you guys are smart enough to know that:

Recession, depression and other measures of economic health are broad judgements of the overall economy's state.

In a recession a lot more people are out of work. Unix and I know about this first hand. So those savings on slightly depressed product prices are theoretical because a larger part of the public can't afford anything anyway.

In a recession, business investment slows down dramatically so there is less momentum yet for hiring.

If I have a wad of money in the bank or an assured job, then hell yes, a recession is good news.

If I really need a job during a recession, not so much.

In boom times, everything just seems easier. Even at an individual level.

Your own stocks are rising, and your job feels more secure, so you can relax and buy what you need, albeit at slightly higher prices.
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