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Since late May of this year, my Intel i7 desktop running Mint 18.3 has displayed the following messages (and messages similar to these) at every system power up.



I poked around in Linux forums for several hours and finally gave up. I assumed that there was something flaky about my USB interface(s) on the motherboard but everything else worked USB wise (including a printer/scanner, and downloading images from a camera USB port) so I didn't do anything about it and chalked it up to an old system.

So lately, as an unrelated thing I did:

I started to use a "GoPro" type action camera again when bike riding. I had a bunch of video clips on a micro SD card. So I needed to use the flash card reader.

I put the card in a SD card carrier and inserted it into the attached flash card reader. (Which internally is an "ATECH" brand chipset and which connects to a USB header pin array on the motherboard.)  The reader simply doesn't see the card. No flashing light on the reader.

In fact, I can't remember using the flash reader successfully since I went to Linux. So I started to track this issue down online. Most articles advised using the command "lsusb" to list all of the USB interfaces and devices. The only device showing was a mouse.

I then remembered - when this box ran Windows 7, I had intermittent unresolved problems with the same card reader there, too. Inserting a memory card did nothing. I would wind up opening the PC case up, and unplugging and re-plugging the card reader. This would "goose" the card reader and PC into operating and recognizing the card reader and also the inserted card.

So, realizing this recently, I opened the case and replugged the same card reader in the mobo. SOLVED. The card reader now shows up in a lsusb listing, and inserting a memory card causes it to be mounted in Linux automatically.

I also found something else, too.

Powering the box down after doing this, and then powering it back up...

The USB errors at startup completely disappeared.

My theory:

The power supply and motherboard always supply current to the USB ports (you can leave devices plugged into the PC to charge) even when the PC is "shut down", not running. There is always a red pilot light lit on the flash card reader even at power down.

My working theory now is that:

Somehow the flash card reader's USB interface enters a locked up or conflicted state.

The fact that power is always applied by the power supply means that the flash card reader never shuts down and therefore the locked-up non functional state remains the rule. The always on flash reader probably had been powered up for weeks or months, since the last time I opened up and worked on the system.

Unplugging/replugging the flash card USB header resets the flash card reader, removing power from the reader, so the error state resets. Good as "new".

Lastly, when the flash card reader was in this bad/invalid state, it interfered with the USB devices or bus at system startup, causing the Linux startup messages about USB problems. These errors (I looked them up) literally mean that the USB interface power is inadequate.

Possibly this contributed to excessively slow Windows boot load times as well when I ran Windows on this box.

MY FIX FOR THIS: (very simple)

The fix is to defeat the always-on USB power state of the computer.

I do so by turning off the toggle switch on the back of the power supply, on the back of the case - after I shut the OS down.

After a few seconds the flash card pilot light goes out.

This restores everything to an absolutely powered off state, so bad logic states, etc don't persist literally for weeks. 

This would have been a very good thing to do as a standard procedure, anyway. The USB doesn't need to stay semi powered up perpetually. I use transformers for my phones and gadgets.

Anyway, problem solved.
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It's not a bug, it's a feature.
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I just checked out of curiosity. The same tire and size is now listed at $91.68. The price is encroaching on the street price for these tires - not quite there yet.


This debunks the assertion made in this thread that Amazon provides a win-win. They rack the price up whenever they feel like it, when demand permits.


Maybe this inflated price is just for me because I keep looking at the same product so much.

Dynamic pricing!
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I just checked out of curiosity. The same tire and size is now listed at $91.68. The price is encroaching on the street price for these tires - not quite there yet.


This debunks the assertion made in this thread that Amazon provides a win-win. They rack the price up whenever they feel like it, when demand permits.


Maybe this inflated price is just for me because I keep looking at the same product so much.
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It takes a special grade of idiot to take what was the world's biggest car company and run it into the ground. Oh way, they ran Ma Bell into the ground too  >:D

Funny you should say that.  I've been reading Out of the Crisis by W. Edwards Deming.  Deming has god-like status in Japan where they credit him with rebuilding Japanese manufacturing after WW2.   Deming's philosophy is that quality is the most important thing a company can do and writes things like "the consumer is the most important point on the production-line".  He says that quality has to built into the system and is down on things like inspecting for quality although he would say it has to be done anyway.

In the book Deming raises the alarm that American companies have got serious managerial problems that have to be corrected or they'll all start looking like the the auto companies -- i.e. the "Crisis".  Some of the problems have to do with lack of long-term planning and not involving labor in decision making. 

Deming died in 1993.  Offshore outsourcing must have been in full swing by that time and he was probably horrified by it when he went to his grave.

I was at Ma Bell in the 90s when we went through big quality improvement initiatives. Eventually we got some Deming awards. Companies don't seem to care today.
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Yeah, this is my own gold plated Princess phone.  >:D I remember when Princess phones and then touch tone phones were the normie/bourgeois status symbols, heavily advertised by the Bell System. 1965 or so.

By the way, back to the tires!

I had them mounted last week.

DAMN, did I make a great choice. They make it feel like an entirely different car. The ride is somehow much better (softer and less noisy) yet the handling is far more precise.

These are nice, nice tires.

At half the price per axle than being a "loyal local" customer of the local tire chains that screwed me blind on my last set of tires.

Sweet, good for you. I have experienced similar things with new tires. I would have  never believed how much different tire brands/models feel on a car.

My original tires for my car were Pirellis. Thats what it came with. They rode hard and were noisy. Than I switched to the Continentals. They ride much nicer and handle great in all kinds of weather conditions.

I am going to follow your advice for the next step. A $ saves is a $ saved.
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If I wanted a muscle car now, I wouldn't start with an old GM Roadmaster at all, but just buy a plug-and-play Toyota. Or Mazda, or Lexus, or something along those lines.

I've had two Camrys. Nothing ever goes wrong with them. I do my own auto repair work - well, light stuff, like brakes and alternators. I forgot how to work on cars since it never broke, ever.
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It takes a special grade of idiot to take what was the world's biggest car company and run it into the ground. Oh way, they ran Ma Bell into the ground too  >:D

Funny you should say that.  I've been reading Out of the Crisis by W. Edwards Deming.  Deming has god-like status in Japan where they credit him with rebuilding Japanese manufacturing after WW2.   Deming's philosophy is that quality is the most important thing a company can do and writes things like "the consumer is the most important point on the production-line".  He says that quality has to built into the system and is down on things like inspecting for quality although he would say it has to be done anyway.

In the book Deming raises the alarm that American companies have got serious managerial problems that have to be corrected or they'll all start looking like the the auto companies -- i.e. the "Crisis".  Some of the problems have to do with lack of long-term planning and not involving labor in decision making. 

Deming died in 1993.  Offshore outsourcing must have been in full swing by that time and he was probably horrified by it when he went to his grave.
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I see. Interesting.

I heard the Northstar engine is problematic, but very powerful.

The #3 Roadmaster I got from the mid 90's was a hotrod, the guy I got it from did some wild things to it. Installed a hot cam, low gears and replaced so many parts it  no longer resembled the car it originally was. Seats came from a Pontiac. etc. The entire suspension was upgraded with non-stock parts.
The engine made all the power at high RPMs and he installed 3.73 low gears that constantly kept the RPMs high, generating lots of power.
It was the ultimate sleeper. He made it seriously fast. It would easily keep up with ricers or BMW M3.

In the end, rust got it.

Points taken, Unix.

All of our Japanese vehicle purchases have been long lived and relatively problem-free.

My Dad never, ever experienced the shit that most GM owners go through because he took advantage of employee discounts and sold every car after exactly one year at a break even or a slight profit, and bought another company rebated car.
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