Author Topic: Transitioning from Consulting back to Full Time Work  (Read 1954 times)

jbucks

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Re: Transitioning from Consulting back to Full Time Work
« Reply #15 on: December 16, 2002, 01:51:27 pm »
Codger -

"Don't any of these dips%&ts keep turnover statistics on their shops? If they bothered to review their own experiences, many of them would discover that the average IT worker in their little piece of heaven has been there less than three years, with many leaving within their first FTE year. "


One of the WORST places I ever worked kept track of this info.  During one memorable meeting, the HR person was bragging that employee turnover during the last quarter was down to 400%!!

simply, amazing...

Jim

Yekke

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Re: Transitioning from Consulting back to Full Time Work
« Reply #16 on: December 16, 2002, 02:12:50 pm »
Maybe off topic - Am on a contract-for-hire now. Client reduced my (and all other remaining contractors) hours to 40/week. They are pushing me to do work for free. I pushed back, now they are pissed. I'm not going to give them more than 2 hours/week w/o being able to bill, but can't afford to lose the deal. help !

codger

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Re: Transitioning from Consulting back to Full Time Work
« Reply #17 on: December 16, 2002, 02:34:46 pm »
Keep meticulous records of any/all work performed "off the clock". This may become the basis for reporting them to the state Labor Dept., or for use by an attorney.

Also maintain a detailed log of conversations where you were intimidated into working for "free".

If you survive the "contract to hire" trial period, you should consider the above treatment before signing on.

Don't they understand that if you're hourly, you're entitled to be paid for all hours worked? Or, are they just thieves?


DG9

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No OT
« Reply #18 on: December 17, 2002, 04:06:29 am »
I have seen the same scenario (40 hour limit, no OT) for contractors/consultants that are not for hire.  As a PM this is especially challenging at times.


codger

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Re: No OT
« Reply #19 on: December 17, 2002, 04:32:45 am »
My point was that one should not work for unpaid hours. If a company wants to place limits on the maximum hours worked, that's fine. They cannot expect hourly workers to continue to work beyond the limits for free. (Actually they can EXPECT it, but that won't make it reality.)

Your skill, your experience and your time. That's all you have to sell. Don't give it away.


Cynical Attitude

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Re: Just a few comments
« Reply #20 on: December 17, 2002, 05:16:47 am »
Quote
Quote:
Theres preparing, over-preparing, and inviting the company to invade your privacy, which is how I would classify bringing your tax returns. Why on earth did you do that? I would never disclose my income to a prospective employer. There must be some compelling reason for it...


A couple of companies that I worked for had gone out of business.  Btw, this was a long time ago and they stayed in my car along with many other documents, my laptop, etc.  

Cynical Attitude

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Re: Transitioning from Consulting back to Full Time Work
« Reply #21 on: December 17, 2002, 05:19:00 am »
Quote
Quote:
One of the WORST places I ever worked kept track of this info. During one memorable meeting, the HR person was bragging that employee turnover during the last quarter was down to 400%!!

simply, amazing...


Yeah, I agree.  Normally, they all just say, "we have a low turnover rate here".

John Masterson

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Re: Transitioning from Consulting back to Full Time Work
« Reply #22 on: December 17, 2002, 07:37:11 am »
"..but I can't afford to lose the deal."

That pretty much dictates what you have to do.

Because you have no bargaining position (i.e. cannot afford to walk) they are playing the tune and you must dance to it, or they will find someone who will.

It's a buyers market when you *cannot* afford to walk away, correct?

Sorry to hear of this frustrating situation. Try to look at it as simply a temporary market condition and NOT a reflection on your personal worth, and keep the money flowing into your bank account, I'd say.

Look at it this way: they have effectively LOWERED the rate they pay you. You can stay or leave. Since you can't leave, make the best of it.

theunixguru

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Re: No OT
« Reply #23 on: December 17, 2002, 02:24:41 pm »
"My point was that one should not work for unpaid hours. If a company wants to place limits on the maximum hours worked, that's
                         fine. They cannot expect hourly workers to continue to work beyond the limits for free. (Actually they can EXPECT it, but that won't
                         make it reality.)

                         Your skill, your experience and your time. That's all you have to sell. Don't give it away. "

Heh maybe more employers will utilize the Walmart approach. They lock the doors and don't pay for the time you are in incarceration.

:D
ug